Antelope Audio Hanging Out With Korn

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For those of you in Germany that couldn’t watch it…now you can!

Antelope Audio Hanging Out with KORN from Korn Row on Vimeo.

Jonathan Davis Interview with Huffington Post

JD featured

Source: Huffington Post

A Conversation with Korn’s Jonathan Davis

Mike Ragogna: So how are you loving the latest tour?

Jonathan Davis: Oh, dude, I love it. It’s been amazing, we’re recording in Australia right now on the big festival Soundwave and we’re doing some side shows with Rob Zombie which have been fun. We’re having a blast, it’s been amazing.

MR: Rob Zombie is pretty smart guy, nice.

JD: That’s awesome. I went and saw Devil’s Rejects tonight on the big screen and he did a Q&A, it was awesome.

MR: You guys are pretty smart as well.

JD: Well, I don’t know if I would call it “smart,” but we threw some s**t out there and a lot of people want to talk to me now.

MR: Well let’s look at that. You have a video out of one of your songs from your latest album, The Paradigm Shift, called “Spike In My Veins.” My interpretation of that video is that there are a lot of issues out there that the government is involved in and they are purposeful distractions like Justin Bieber or other celebrities that are being used. How far off am I?

JD: No, you nailed it right on the head.

MR: Okay, regardless of whoever is doing it, it seems to me that that’s been used in the culture forever. “Hey you, look over here at this shiny object!” This time, it’s with celebrities, although these artists have been particularly “shiny” lately.

JD: Yeah, I don’t understand why people are so obsessed with artists. I’m not going to say that Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus aren’t being what artists are because I’ve never met an artist in my life that was sane; it’s just how it goes. I’m crazy. Artists aren’t normally sane people, so of course, they’re going to be doing this stuff. I never thought it was those people’s fault. I feel like maybe the government takes advantage of that because maybe people want to live through them vicariously and that’s why they’re so interested in them. But I think it’s just a cool opportunity–it’s happened for years and years and years–the government can take that opportunity to distract so the NSA can spy on everybody. Every time you buy something online, every time you talk on your phone or do anything, there’s data collecting. I thought we were living in the United States of America where you’re not supposed to do that. I think people are getting kind of pissed off and fed up. By doing this video, I think it struck a chord with some people.

MR: But might it also be true there’s capitalization of artists’ craziness going on by the media? As Paul Simon said in “Have A Good Time,” “They’re just out to capture my dime.”

JD: Yeah, that’s probably right. I mean, any way you look at it, it’s f**ked. I’m going to be honest about it. I’m not going to try to come up with some quote, I think it’s just f**ked, period. Everything.

MR: A lot of people would agree. Things have spiraled out to the point where it’s very hard to see what reality is. You pointed that out in your video, or at least that could be another interpretation. It’s hard to see what reality is when you’re being bombarded by all of these distractions.

JD: Yeah. Over the years with the internet and everything, we’re so inundated with information all the time people have the attention span of a f**king gnat. “What’s next, what’s next, what’s next?” You can also use that to your advantage. All these texts they put out, people can look at them and be totally disgusted.

MR: Some people have said, “If you want something not done right, then let the government do it.” No considering that, do you think the US government is competent enough to do anything with the data they’ve collected? How do they even know where to begin?

JD: Where do you begin? There are people out there, groups like Anonymous. I go on all of these sites where people are calling for revolution; it’s pretty scary what’s going on in the world. I don’t know how many countries are having revolutions right now, it just seems like it’s in the air.

MR: Or a turning around of oppression and injustice. What about that?

JD: Yeah. People are just fed up with being lied to by the governments. We just want them to be straight with us. Everybody’s broke and on unemployment, people are pissed.

MR: Is there anything that’s happening right now that seems to be a glimmer of hope? Are suggestions like raising the minimum wage or the rolling out of the Affordable Care Act also shiny objects for distraction?

JD: Maybe? I know what you’re saying. They could be. Ultimately, what’s happening? Honestly, I just wish it was the way it used to be when I was a kid, man. Things have changed so damn much and it’s f**king scary. But I have three boys, three little kids, and they’re going to have to inherit all of this bulls**t. That just scares me.

MR: I have a son, it scares me too what he’s going to inherit.

JD: That’s my motivation. I’m not super-pumped. I just don’t like what’s going on right now.

MR: Jonathan, what about the new album? Are you happy that it is such a successful release?

JD: Yeah, man, we’ve been working hard. We’ve been on tour for twenty years; I think the longest we’ve had off is ten months. You have peaks and valleys and it’s nice to see people coming out to our shows because we have fun.

MR: What do you think it was about this album that resonated so well with people?

JD: One of the things is that we got Head back in the band. He’s one of the original members, it’s our first album with him back. We’ve been always trying to come up with new styles of music and do records different every time, we get really bored when we do the same thing over and over again. So I think it’s having Head back and also taking everything we’ve learned over the years of Head being gone. We’re really proud of this record; it’s so experimental and different, we’re taking electronics and heavy metal music and mixing them together.

MR: With this album, do you think Korn has become Korn 2.0?

JD: Oh yeah, Brian coming back revitalized the band. this record was the most fun I’ve ever had making a record and I think it just shows, everybody was so happy and we were so pumped and making it was such a great experience that when it came out people just loved it.

MR: Other than “Spike In My Veins,” are there a couple other songs on this project that you would want a listener to rush to to hear how great this record is?

JD: All the songs are all different. One of my favorite songs on there is called “Victimized.” It’s kind of a jam, and it’s half-electronic, half-rock band, and I love it.

MR: Was the writing process different than other projects?

JD: When we did the record, the band got together in August of last year and started writing and I didn’t get into the studio until February I believe. I had to go to rehab and detox off of Xanax. I have really bad panic attacks, so I was getting detoxed from Xanax because my doctor said, “This stuff is horrible for you, we’ve got to take you off of it.” It took about a year for me to really detox off of that and to be coherent again. When I was writing the record and doing the vocals, I was seriously one foot in the alley, one out. I just flew around trying to make my brain heal itself from the damage it did to itself with those drugs. It made it pretty special for me. I actually moved into the studio and had my two boys, PIrate and Zeppy, living with me. My boys were my inspiration the whole time, going in there and singing and watching me in the studio, because that studio was my father’s and before that, it was Buck Owens’ studio. I remember being a little kid and going in that studio and watching Buck and watching my dad, so it was a treat to have my own children in there watching me. It was a pretty cool experience.

MR: That is really cool. Korn has been around long enough to have a double-disc Essential release. That’s just shy of a box set. What do you think about that?

JD: Dude, this whole thing has been a trip to me. We’re the luckiest band on the planet. We’re just five guys from Bakersville, California. We go from that to the success we’ve had over the twenty years from our first release. It’s just pretty surreal, man. I still can’t believe it.

MR: And I imagine you’re a little more nostalgic these days because Brian is back.

JD: Yeah, yeah, definitely. This time around, it’s nice being on tour because we’ve all grown up more and all the partying and craziness from when we were kids has stopped. It’s actually more fun now than it was then.

MR: Congratulations. The group has had an amazing career to this point. When you look back at songs like “Did My Time” and “Evolution,” what would you say is the legacy of Korn?

JD: [laughs] I don’t know, bro. That’s a hard question.

MR: What would you like your legacy to be? If someone says, “Korn meant this…”

JD: I think it meant a lot. I think Korn means hope for a lot of people who’ve been picked on for anything in our lives. Every day a fan says, “Jonathan, you saved my life with your music” or “Your lyrics did this or that.” That’s the legacy that I want to be remembered by–helping all these kids that didn’t have anywhere to turn but turn the radio on or turn a CD on and that music helped them in some way. More and more, now that we’ve gotten older and the fans have gotten older and are bringing their kids, it seems to ring universally. This music helps them vent whatever frustrations they have inside and they actually feel better from it. I’d like to be remembered for that. It’s the only reason I’m still doing this s**t. I’m getting old. I’m not going to stop because it’s so f**king cool to see these people so touched by some art that we made together, you know what I mean?

MR: It’s true, you’ve affected many. So what advice do you have for new artists?

JD: For new artists? Hustle your ass off. When we were trying to get signed we had a sound that nobody knew what the f**k to do with and was scared of. All we did was hustle and hustle, playing shows, putting our money together to order sticker paper; we slapped Korn stickers all up and down California. Marketing yourself. We didn’t have internet back then. If you really believe in your project and you feel it’s good and you know in your heart it’s good, go out and take advantage of all the things that are out there and just push and don’t give up until you achieve your goal.

MR: Beautiful. One last question, President Obama and the US government feature heavily in the music video of “Spike In The Veins.” If you had one thing to say to them, what would it be?

JD: What would I tell them? What could you tell them? What could I really tell him to change things? Do I really think it’s him? I think he was handed a big giant s**t sandwich from the president before. He started all that stuff. Do you really think it’s him or is there someone behind that? I’m not going to go into one of the crazy-ass conspiracy theories, but I don’t think there’s anything I could f**king say to that guy that could change anything.

MR: Wow.

JD: I’m being honest. He’d look at me and go, “Okay, okay,” and nothing would happen.

MR: Okay, then what do you think the people should be doing right now?

JD: I think they should be pissed and demand that the government stop spying on them and gathering all this data. It’s all we can do. I mean this in a peaceful way, I’m not saying go out and start crazy s**t, but I think if enough people are outraged by it, then I think the president will start listening. I got an email from my friend today that says the Al-Qaeda are trying to shut down the NSA spying program. I know it’s bulls**t, but at least he said it. All those motherf**kers on Capitol Hill have got to go. We need to let new ones in and maybe it will be all right again. But everybody’s feeding all of them their agendas, how do you know if you’re being represented? It sucks. That’s why the whole thing needs to change.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

Jonathan Davis on Spike In My Veins Controversy

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Source: Ruidoso Freepress

Prospect Park/Caroline RecordsThe video for Korn’s latest single, “Spike in My Veins,” has ignited some controversy, so much that singer Jonathan Davis tells ABC News Radio, “I think [that] as a band, we’re gonna cause some kind of ruckus, but we really didn’t understand at the time that we’d cause this much. I mean, it was really really strange to watch this all happen. We didn’t think it would get this big.”

The video is a straight-out slam of what the band members see as the state of personal privacy — or lack thereof — in the world today, and features clips of President Obama giving an official address to the nation, spliced with a clip of his appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, interspersed with appearances from Justin Bieber, Miley Cyrus and a bevy of politicians.

What’s the message? The band believes that the U.S. government waits for crazy, headline-grabbing celebrity stories and seizes the opportunity to pass restrictive laws when very few people are watching. Davis tells ABC News Radio, “I’ve never really been a political person…but to… hear about Obama passing all these crazy laws, and the NSA spying thing and all that stuff…it just really intrigued me.”

“[Miley Cyrus was] just going up there and acting a fool [twerking at MTV awards], and everybody loves that, and that’s all everybody cared about at that moment,” he continues. “And no one was really focusing on what was going on with the government taking away our liberties, the NSA spying, all that stuff.”

Despite the band’s including Cyrus and Justin Bieber in the video, Jonathan Davis says he’s got no hard feelings toward them — in fact, he tells ABC News Radio that if Bieber came to a Korn show, “Of course [I’d let him in]. I can’t hate on that kid. None of these people know that they’re being used as distractions.”

“That kid’s…larger than life, he’s got more money than anything in the world, of course he’s gonna freak out,” Davis continued, referring to Bieber. “Of course little Miley Cyrus is doing this stuff, because it’s fun, it’s crazy, and people love [it].”

Korn Video Testimonial – Parents of the Singing Korn Kids

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Korn’s Jonathan Davis calls Obama a ‘dictator’ (Bakersfield Californian)

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Source: Bakersfield Californian

BY JENNIFER SELF Californian lifestyles editor jself@bakersfield.com

When Jonathan Davis of Korn wants to deliver a message, he usually uses his music. But in a pair of interviews earlier this week, the Bakersfield rock star made one thing abundantly clear: President Obama is one leader he’s not following.

“Nobody cares what’s going on behind the closed doors,” Davis said, “when Obama makes all these crazy laws that take away more and more of our privacy and make him more of a dictator.”

All four original members of Korn were back in their hometown in recent days, reportedly shooting a documentary that appears to focus on guitarist Brian Welch, who rejoined the band in 2012 after a seven-year absence.

Rick Davis — father of Korn frontman Jonathan Davis, the only member of the group who still lives in Bakersfield — was interviewed for about an hour last week.

“They wanted to go to the old John Bryan’s (nightclub) on Stockdale and Lennox,” the elder Davis said. “That’s where Jon made his debut as a singer, with his band Sex Art in the early ’90s.”

Davis said his contact on the film was executive producer Scott Mayo, whose company worked with Welch before on a faith-based testimonial video called “I Am Second,” in which Welch discussed his drug addiction, failures as a father and the spiritual awakening that ultimately prompted his decision to leave the band.

“All the questions were about Korn and their journey,” Davis said.

“Reading between the lines, there was a lot of discussion about what led up to Brian leaving the band and the growth he made.”

Davis made his comments Monday in a video interview with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on the website infowars.com. Later that day, at Los Angeles International Airport, he repeated much of what he told Jones when questioned by the tabloid website TMZ.

Davis was asked by both sources about a recent video Korn released to promote the song “Spike in My Veins” from the band’s 2013 album, “The Paradigm Shift.” The not-so-subtle denunciation of Obama juxtaposes news clips of pop stars like the twerking-and-smirking duo of Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber with the president, seen dancing with Ellen DeGeneres, schmoozing on the late-night talk circuit and assuring Americans their phones are not being tapped.

“It seems really sad that everyone’s asleep and oblivious to the fact that the country is using the media to, I don’t know, capture people’s attention or take away from the fact of what’s going on with our country.”

Though Davis, through his representative, agreed to discuss his comments and what appears to be an emerging political activism with The Californian, he failed to call the paper at the appointed time. However, his father, Rick, did have some thoughts on his son’s comments, noting it was just a few years ago, as expressed in the lyrics of the Korn song “Politics,” that Davis seemed far less inclined to take a stand:

“Don’t want to talk about politics, don’t preach or talk about politics, don’t make me talk about politics.”

Though a bit surprised by his son’s about-face, the elder Davis is proud.

“For him to make an open political statement about his opinion about something, that’s new for him. I’ve not seen it in the past,” said Davis, the retired Kern County film commissioner and a musician himself.

“I give him A’s for standing up for what he believes in. Whether I agree or disagree with his positions is secondary. He’s exercising his right to express himself, but he’s speaking for the band, too. The band is saying to the fan base, ‘Wake up and pay attention.'”

Davis has noticed his son’s world view becoming more conservative with time. The singer seems especially concerned with what he sees as an increasingly heavy-handed government intruding on citizens’ privacy and other rights. In his remarks to Jones, Davis even hinted that it might be time for another American revolution.

“Jon is surprisingly more conservative than a lot of other folks in the entertainment business,” said his dad, “but he’s from Kern County. What do you expect?”

Jonathan Davis on TMZ…Korny Konspiracy Korner with Korn

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Jonathan Davis in TMZ Obama Uses Media to Distract America

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Source: TMZ

Korn frontman Jonathan Davis is unleashing the mother of all conspiracy theories — President Obama’s secret agenda to become a tyrannical dictator with Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber and Kanye West’s assistance!

We asked Davis about his band’s new “Spike in My Veins” music video — which is filled with clips of Miley and other pop culture phenoms — and suddenly it was all aboard the crazy train.

You gotta see it … right in the middle of LAX, Davis spewed a theory about Obama using celeb scandals as a “distraction” … while he screws us out of our freedoms.
Por ejemplo … JD claims Miley’s VMA twerkfest was really a smoke screen for something way more nefarious. Nuts, right?

Consider this: Obama signed a law allowing the government to hold citizens indefinitely without trial … back in January 2012 … when the big celeb news was Miley and a penis cake.

Jonathan Davis on BREAL.TV with Shaun Vizzy

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Source: BREAL.TV

Thanks Shaun Vizzy!

Korn frontman, Jonathan Davis recently sat down with BREAL.TV to discuss various subjects, including which song he felt put Korn on the map and his dream collaborations with hip-hop artists.

Jonathan Davis on TMZ Don’t Blame Devil for Craigslist Murder

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Source: TMZ

Thank you Davidbaeza_jr

Korn’s lead singer paid good money for serial killer memorabilia from Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy — but he’s drawing the line with Miranda Barbour … and thinks her murders definitely were NOT satanic.

Jonathan Davis — who also performs as JDevil — says the alleged Craigslist killer is following a tired serial killer script … “They just blame that s**t on the devil ’cause they’ve been blaming it on the devil forever. It’s got nothing to do with the devil.”

Davis once bought Bundy’s VW Bug and Gacy’s clown suit — so, he’s kind of a serial killer expert — but he explained why he won’t be snatching up any of Barbour’s possessions.

Basically, death was a phase … and JDevil’s over it.

Jonathan Davis on The Alex Jones Show on Monday

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Jonathan was originally scheduled to appear on 14 Feb but due to Skype issues wasn’t able to. Alex Jones says Jonathan Davis will join the show on Monday at 2:34 into the program.

The show aires from 11 am – 2 pm CST on Monday.

Watch the show live here: http://www.infowars.com/watch-alex-jones-show/

Listen to the show live here: http://prisonplanet.tv/news/watch_free/free_to_look_audio.php

Jonathan Davis and Nicholas O’Toole Talk About Composing After the Dark

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Source: Media Mikes

“After The Dark” is the latest film by director John Huddles. The film takes place at an international school in Jakarta, where a philosophy teacher challenges his class of twenty graduating seniors to choose which ten of them would take shelter underground and reboot the human race in the event of a nuclear apocalypse. The film was scored by veteran film composer Nicholas O’Toole and Korn front man Jonathan Davis and Media Mikes had the pleasure of talking with both of them about their work on the film and their ongoing collaboration with one another.

Adam Lawton: How did you both become involved with the film?
Nicholas O’Toole: I was approached by George Zakk who was one of the producers on the film. I had known him from another project and they had just started to go into post production on this film. George had known that Jonathan and I had been working together for quite some time and it seemed like a good fit. This led to a discussion with director John Huddles. We ended up hitting it off right away and we have stayed friends since.

AL: What was the creative process like between the two of you?
NO: The dynamic is great as we have known each other for so long. We get what the other one does. I myself am very technically minded and I have a degree in film score work where Jonathan is prolific in songwriting, EDM and a variety of other things including film scoring. We sort of mind shared this project. Jonathan is very dynamic and variant based. He brings a lot to the table from sound design, to mood and colors. I handle the more technical side of things such as arranging and post work. With Jonathan on the road a lot he and I developed a good solution for sharing our thoughts and ideas. We walked in to the project already having a pretty good flow.

AL: Jonathan, did you find any similarities in your writing style for the film and you writing style for Korn?
Jonathan Davis: It is completely different. That’s why I love it. It challenges me. When you are writing a film score you are trying to convey an emotion part of the film. That’s the whole reason why I love doing things like this as it is so different from the other writing that I do. When you are working on a song you have versus and choruses to stick to and with a project like this there are no rules. It’s really different.

AL: Is scoring something you picture yourself doing more of?
JD: I love doing it and am open to doing more. I am just a musical junkie. When I got sober back in the day I replaced partying with music. (Laughs) It is something that I can’t get enough of.

AL: Did you both work on the same partsafter-the-dark together or did you work separately on various parts of the film?
NO: It was purely linear in this particular instance. John Huddles was involved as well from the ground level which made things even greater. Having John involved certainly reduced the re-writes. Normally you create a bunch of material and then show case but for this film John was there the whole time and fully invested. I think we just moved from beginning to end on this and then went back and did some adjusting where it was needed. I think you can sort of hear that in the arc of the story. We kept things moving and it felt very natural.

AL: How much of the film were you allowed to see at one time when you were scoring?
NO: We got the film in a reel which is the general process of post production. We are all contracted to confidentiality. You get the entire film however they may still be editing and changing some of the things. We would get new reels every week. We had a screening with the director where we saw the film in its entirety and we discussed where the music would go and for how long and what type of feel was needed. Everything gets spotted out and then we follow those notes and begin writing. You definitely have to understand the narrative in order to be able to start scoring.

AL: After the initial playing of the film with the score were there a lot of changes requested by the director?
NO: Things did change. The film was shot in Indonesia which is known for a style of music called Gamelan. Jonathan had some previous experiences with this style of music as had I in the past so this ended up being a pleasant coincident. We were going to take a more Gamelan eccentric approach anyhow which we did at first. John Huddles liked it but wanted to try a different approach. We repositioned ourselves in a way that caught fire and we were able to just take off. We kept things quite minimal arrangement wise and then mixed in a little Gamelan with electronic and hypnotic elements. We kept things very natural.

AL: Jonathan, did you have any reservations about working on the project? And do you have to get a specific type of mind set to work on this type of music?
JD: Not really. I love doing music. It’s always fun working with Nick and writing music. It was really great working with a director who had a specific vision. This was something so completely normal from what I do in my day job. I think you have to take yourself away because you are writing a piece of music not a song. I have to wrap my head around that but it’s basically music.

AL: Being that you guys have a friendship with one another outside of your work what do you enjoy most about working with each other?
JD: For me we are just friends making music. It’s a simple and pure thing. I am having fun making music for a cool movie and getting paid for it. There is no bad side to this what so ever. It’s just fun!
NO: The collaboration process is enhancing because if it was just me I would be writing out of my head. Jonathan adds another creative brain which comes from a completely different place. When you put the two together the result is always something bigger than what it would have been. Jonathan is prolific outside of Korn in ways that I think fans of the band will totally understand after hearing this. Like Jonathan said it’s just fun and we have a good vibe together so it’s great to be able to keep that going.

AL: What other projects do you guys have in the works for the rest of 2014?
NO: I am always negotiating on some sort of film project. Sometimes the project is working with Jonathan and sometimes it’s on my own. Jonathan and I have a good system worked out.
JD: I have quite a lot going on with Korn but with computers these days it allows Nick and me to be in different places but still be able to work together on projects with one another. I always have my noise buried in my laptop writing.

Jonathan Davis: After the Dark Soundtrack Out Now on iTunes and Amazon

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Source: Blabbermouth

Buy the After the Dark Original Motion Picture Soundtrack on iTunes here or on Amazon here NOW!
Physical CD will be out on 11 March on Varese which you can buy